2 Minute ReadYing Gao’s ‘Possible Tomorrows’ Collection Reacts To Strangers

Ying Gao, new project 'Possible Tomorrows' designed to emancipate us from political technology.

Ying Gao‘s speciality is creative projects. Her work transcends technological experimentation. Previous wearable tech projects have included garments integrated with eye-tracking systems that move and light up when under someone’s gaze. Gao’s work stands out because she explores the construction of the garment, the garment’s function as a fragile protective space and questions the assumptions made about clothing.

Possible Tomorrows

Her latest venture is called ‘Possible Tomorrows’. It is a project that lives and breathes the belief that design is the medium situated in the technological rather than in the textile realm and that sensory technologies allow garments to become more poetic and interactive. Goa is introducing us to interactive clothing with fingerprint recognition technology, the ‘Possible Tomorrows’ garments are made up of nylon mesh, nylon thread, PVDF thread, thermoplastic and electronic devices that can send data to a microprocessor that uses Arduino – an open-source electronics platform.

ALSO READ: The Parallax Dress, Merging New Intelligent Technology With Evolutionary Behaviour

So to appreciate it, you have to imagine wearing a dress that is connected to a fingerprint recognition system that can acknowledge strangers with an animated reaction triggered by the motors embedded in each of the panels.  “The purpose of the project is to subvert the logic of security so that garments become anti-security objects,” fashion designer and professor Ying Gao told Dezeen. “The logic of security has become a political technology, that too often prevents us from emancipating. I would like these garments to open up to people that are strangers.”

The design was developed from a series of algorithms linked to the realm of pattern recognition, or scatter graph. The aesthetic and motion of these garments evoke hypotrochoids, shapes borrowed from the vintage game Spirograph: their flattened curves are drawn by a single point linked to a mobile circle that rolls without sliding on and inside of an initial circle.

Share Your Tips & Corrections

Muchaneta Kapfunde
Founding Editor in Chief at | editor@fashnerd.com

Founding editor-in-chief & WearableTechStylist of FashNerd.com has worked in the fashion industry for over 14 years. She is currently one of the leading influencers speaking and writing about the merger of fashion with technology and wearable technology. She also contributes to other digital news sites like Wareable.